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Business Travel Travel Industry

Improving The Safety For Women Business Travelers In Your Company

Whether it’s a concern about terrorist attacks, identity theft, or simply food poisoning, your health and wellbeing is important while on the road. Unfortunately, according to a study by GBTA, women business travelers often feel concerned about their own safety while traveling on business. In fact, of the women surveyed, 80% reported at some point feeling worried about their personal safety while traveling. More needs to be done in the business travel industry to help women feel secure while traveling on behalf of their company.

Women business travelers often have concerns for their safety while traveling on business

This study from GBTA and AIG, found that:

  • 83% of the women surveyed reported that in the past year one or more safety-related concerns or incidences occurred while traveling for business.
  • 63% think about safety always or frequently while traveling, and their concerns for safety have been escalating.
  • 84% of women say their employers either did not provide safety tips or resources, or they were not aware of such tools. It is startling to think that majority of employers in the study are not providing the adequate duty of care and support for their employees. Even if these companies have risk management protocols in place, their communication is ineffective.

Ultimately, both the business traveler and the company wants the business trip to be productive and successful. Your travelers are less likely to do so if they are preoccupied with safety concerns or security issues. Women often feel these effects more in our society than other demographics, and this study shows how significantly under prepared most women feel when traveling on business. Recognizing this immense gap is the first step in helping to resolve the problem.

What can your company do to help women (and men) feel safer while traveling on business?

  • Listen to their concerns – As the person booking travel, you may not be aware that your go-to hotel in Seattle is down a dark alley and their after-hour front desk manager is a creep. Establishing an open culture in your office about business travel concerns could make a big difference. If travelers know they can come to you, you’ve already tackled one of the biggest hurdles in this issue. Depending on the travel policy or vendor contracts, you might not be able to change hotels completely, but you can at least keep these comments in mind when you review your program or vendor contracts down the line.
  • Discuss duty of care policies and procedures – We often find that most travelers don’t know the security features within their travel program. It often puts travelers at ease knowing that their itinerary is known, and communication is always open through features like our Security Check.
  • Educate travelers on theft, phishing scam and identity theft – Did you know that hotels have one of the highest rates of identity theft? Keeping your employees educated on the common threats, and more importantly, how to evert them, will provide them the tools to travel safer and with more confidence.

In this survey, 80% of the women at one point or another did not feel safe while traveling on behalf of their company. This should not be acceptable in the business industry today. It is up to individual companies to provide an open culture for employees to voice their concerns. As well as have effective communication for employees to understand the policies in place to make them feel supported.

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Business Travel Travel Tips

14 Safety Tips For Business Travelers

One of the amazing byproducts of travel is finding yourself in out-of-the-ordinary situations. In most cases, discovering a new food, meeting new people or experiencing a new culture is an exciting thing. But unfortunately, this travel byproduct can also lead to harmful situations; like natural disasters, burglary or worse. In a time that feels like danger is lurking behind every corner, most travelers are realizing more preparation is required to stay safe. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of safety tips for business travelers, We’ve also included a few recommended products to keep close while on your journeys.

14 safety tips for business travelers

Before you leave:

  • Research, research and more research. Know what to expect at your destination city, around your hotel, and which neighborhoods to explore.
    • Try different news and information sources than you typically check before travel or planning a trip. You might be surprised by the additional information you can find this way.
    • If you are traveling internationally, always check the U.S. Department of State travel and individual country information. Find best practices for traveling, as well as travel advisories you may not have been aware of for different regions of countries.
    • Check foreign news sources, like BBC, which can provide insights not highlighted in U.S. news sources.
    • Reading the travel advisories on the Canadian or Australian Department of Foreign Affairs websites may provide additional insight as well.
  • Participate in the State Department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program. Register and provide your travel details, so the U.S. embassy will know that you’re in the area. Download the Smart Traveler App to stay informed and in contact.
  • Always find medical clinics nearby when you’re traveling by registering with the International Association on Medical Assistance for Travelers.
  • Splurge for the international phone plan. It will be worth it in an emergency. And reap the benefits by staying in touch while you’re out of the country.
  • Take photos of important documents and information, like passport, driver’s license, and a credit card. Keep a copy with a family member or friend at home, or in a locked site like DropBox.
  • Always have a support system in place before leaving. We, of course, recommend a trusted travel management company or agency, who will always be available should something arise. But travel insurance or a family member with your itinerary and information is always a good idea too.

While traveling:

  • Try to avoid sticking out like a sore thumb and dress like a local.
  • Stay in groups if you are planning on going somewhere a little risky. By staying with a pack, you will likely avoid pickpockets, theft and even kidnapping. Even in light of the Las Vegas and Paris events of 2017, the most common threat to travelers will be pickpocketing or other petty crimes.
  • Don’t unplug. Unfortunately major events can happen at any time, even if you’re on vacation. Bring your phone, keep it on, and subscribe to major alerts in your area. Our favorite is our SecurityLogic® Travel Alerts, which automatically alerts users of events, weather, and emergencies depending on their location.
  • Travel light and cheap.  Avoid designer luggage that may draw attention and keep expensive items at home.

Products to keep with you while traveling:

  • Personal emergency alarm – This lightweight device sounds a high-pitched alarm if you find yourself in an uneasy situation.  It’s perfect to take while sightseeing or if going for a run in an unfamiliar area.
  • Alarmed door stop – Feel 100% safe in your hotel room with a door stop alarm. Take it with you when you travel, and simply place next to any door that may need extra security. Should someone try to enter unexpectedly, the door stop will be engaged and sound an alarm.

Business travel can expose travelers to new situations and locations. To take full advantage of these opportunities, it’s best to be prepared and aware of potential risks. We hope this post helped plan your future trips. If you are interested in learning more about how our business travel management services supports your employee’s travel risk, please contact us.

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Business Travel Travel Tips

Top Business Traveler Threats

When you think of ‘threats’ while traveling, you probably think of major catastrophes, like kidnappings, bombings, or terrorism. Fortunately, Buying Business Travel found the biggest threats facing business travelers are not nearly as ‘exciting’. These top business traveler threats are actually pretty commonplace. Regardless, it’s important to be aware of areas of concern and how to avoid them. 

Most common threats for business travelers

  • Petty Non-violent Crimes – These are crimes like pickpocketing or petty robbery. Even areas known for being safer to visit, like Europe, has their high risk areas for petty crimes. People seen as ‘weaker’, like women traveling alone of older individuals are often targets. The key is to stay alert and take precautions. Mitigate yourself looking like a target. Even if you are lost, don’t look it. Confidence can convey a lot. Keep your valuables out of sight, or leave them behind. Though it can be hard for business travelers, dress to blend in.
  • Road Traffic Accidents – The risk of being involved in a road accident while traveling is higher than when you are at home. Probably because you are in a variety of situations involving rental cars, taxis, car services, car pooling, etc. Looking internationally, the risk of road accidents goes up. Did you  know there are more road accidents in China than in all of Africa? The best way to prepare for this is with some research. If you are traveling abroad, make sure you are familiar with emergency response procedures. Also understand the car insurance if you are renting a vehicle.
  • Food Poisoning – Whether it’s from unhygienic preparation or just unfamiliarity, sickness from food is commonplace. The most common resulting from E. Coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter and Listeria, found in meats, eggs, fruits and dairy. Water quality can be a factor in food poisoning in other countries as well. Try the “If you can’t boil it, cook it, peel it, than forget it.” mantra when traveling.

Though these aren’t the most interesting threats, they are important nonetheless. Before you head out on your next business trip, be sure to prepare for these potential hazards.

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Business Travel Travel Industry

How Should Travel Suppliers Accommodate For Women Business Travelers?

Many travel suppliers are missing the mark on the fastest growing majority of their customers — women business travelers. According to The Women In Business Travel Report, conducted by Maiden Voyage, 47 percent of women who travel, travel on business and 80 percent of all travel spend is managed by women. This makes them currently the fastest growing segment of business travelers.

So, what are these travel suppliers doing to accommodate this growing segment of their customers? Though there have been studies and enhancements over the past few years, there is still a lot of room for improvement.  

Where should travel suppliers be focusing on to further accommodate women traveler preferences?

Safety and Security

Joe Bates of the Global Business Travel Association observes that women have a greater focus on safety and security. “It would be things like, ‘Is the hotel located in a safe part of town? How do I know the taxi company I’m using is a reputable one?’ … Things of that nature tend to resonate much more with women than with male travelers.”Bates says. 

It’s not rocket science that staying safe is a priority for women traveling alone. MaidenVoyage.com, who conducted the survey, is a website that connects female business travelers with each other to rate hotels and share experiences. Hotels are then scored based on specific safety concerns, such as 24-hour front desk attendants or on-site secure parking. What is most often discovered is that hotel staff can go even further in analyzing their actions and behavior to make guests feel more secure. Does your staff loudly announce the hotel room number at the front desk? Do they consider which room to book for a single women traveling specially? Thinking about these tiny details in the hotel services experiences can change the experience for solo travelers.

Dedicated Services & Amenities

Another reason the increase of women business travelers should be on traveler supplier’s radar, is their tendency to be the planner in future travels. Women make up 85% of purchase choices for households. Their opinions hold firm weight in the long run. Was their experience in the hotel enjoyable enough to plan a family location or future business trip to include your hotel again? 

Hotel amenities and quality of the services are overall more particular to women. This is why some hotels are leveraging this by adjusting amenities. Some hotels have added complimentary curling irons, hair straighteners, increased electrical outlets in the bathroom, and enlarged makeup mirrors. 

The Hyatt Group has done extensive research into this demographic. After an 18 month survey, they improved their services by adding the ‘Hyatt Has It’ program and additional amenities. Guests can rent or purchase items they may have forgotten to bring. Whether it be a room humidifier or extra hair conditioner, Hyatt has positioned themselves as the reliable friend who can ensure your comfort while visiting.

Business travel services are always changing, and in this respect, I think it’s changing for the better. Though originally targeted for women, having a larger focus on safety protocols and elevating usability of hotels and complimentary items are things that can benefit everyone.

Read Next:

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Categories
Travel Tips

Hotel Room Safety – Choosing The Right Room Location

Regardless if your travel is for  business or pleasure, domestic or international, there is a high probability that you will be staying in a hotel. Unfortunately in our world today, it is safe practice to keep security in mind while planning travel. Below are a few tips from an expert on security and safety in hotels.

The hotel room location matters in an emergency

Rob Walker, head of information and analysis for travel security at London-based International SOS, told the MailOnline Travel which rooms are the best to book for a better chance of survival in the event of a fire, attack, or disaster. If traveling in the United States, his suggestions include choosing a room above the first or second floors yet lower than the sixth or seventh floors. The reason? Those rooms are out of harm’s way in terms of burglars, but low enough that you could survive a fall if you needed to jump. It’s also within reach of most fire department ladders.

“We also recommend travelers request rooms on the side of the building further away from the lobby, which is likely to be the main entry point for any attacker,” Walker said. “It is preferable to also choose the side away from other public areas, such as hotel restaurants, as those areas can be a target area, and rooms that are not easily accessed from the street, so as not to be an easy target for criminals. Yet, ideally it is good to be near the emergency exit stairs.”

Additional hotel room safety tips:

Along with having things like an emergency evacuation plan ready to go, Walker recommends keeping a few other things in mind:

  • Avoid rooms with interlocking doors if possible.
  • Choose hotels that are not in high crime neighborhoods.
  • Make sure your room has the following: deadbolts, an eyehole, and evacuation procedures.
  • Pack a doorstop.
  • When you enter, prop your hotel room door open with your luggage and do a quick sweep to make sure there are no intruders.

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Business Travel Travel Tips

Corporate Travel Car Rental Safety

At a recent Association of Corporate Travel Executives’ (ACTE) Education Day, Detective Kevin Coffey outlined a number of best practices for business travel safety.

Click here for Part 1: Corporate Travel Safety On-Board an Aircraft

Click here for Part 2: Corporate Travel Hotel Safety

Using car rentals for business travel provides flexibility in getting around and can sometimes be less expensive than taxis. But while business travelers are generally aware of air and hotel safety precautions, not many of us think too much about car safety. Here are nine tips:

1. Don’t forget the basics.

Most savvy business travelers know to decline car rental insurance because it’s usually covered by their company or credit card. But it’s double check before you go. Also, always do the “walk around” the car. While it may seem unnecessary, the one time you forget may be the time you are blamed for someone else’s mistake. Before driving off the lot, make sure everything is working and that you know where signals and indicators are located. Trying to adjust your side mirror on the freeway does not make for a safe driver.

2. Keep your keys safe.

Keep your car keys with you and out of sight at all times. Years ago, car rental companies eliminated their logos from the cars, as they became targets for theft. While this precaution is helpful, you can still spot travelers by their car rental keys. Usually the ring has both sets of keys on it and a big tag with the make, model, color, and license number on it. Since you are traveling, a thief will know your car may have valuables in it.

3. Choose your parking space wisely.

Be careful when parking at events where thieves will know you will be gone for a set period of time (such as sporting or entertainment). Park “trunk out.” If storing items in your trunk, this makes your trunk visible in an aisle where more people are apt to see suspicious activity. When parking on the street, choose a busy area, i.e. in front of a store, hotel entrance, under a street lamp, or a busy corner. If the street seems too vulnerable, park in a parking garage where the likelihood of being broken into is less. However, still be aware of your surroundings. Being in a place where people can’t see you leaves you open to other acts of violence.

4. Load and hide your stuff before you reach your destination.

Everything you plan on leaving in the car should be stowed and hidden before you arrive at your destination. If, upon arrival, you take the action of stowing your valuables, you are exposing your possessions for all to see.

5. Don’t leave any possessions visible in the car.

It takes a thief five seconds to smash the glass, grab your valuables, and be out of sight, even with the alarm sounding. Keep in mind, it’s not only valuables in plain sight that are a target, but any bag or box may have something valuable to a thief. Even if replaceable, you are left with a broken window, which now you must deal with the car rental company to report the damage.

6. Unload your stuff away from your parking space.

If you have to remove luggage or valuables out of the trunk, do so away from your parking space, if possible. Should a thief see you taking it out, he/she will know that you’ll likely return with it, leaving you vulnerable as a target.

7. A neat car is less likely to get robbed.

On longer trips or road trips, we tend to leave more items in the car as we don’t want to haul everything back and forth to our hotel room at each stop. But leaving bags, or even covering items with jackets only attracts interest. If there isn’t much in the car, there is less curiosity.

8. Check for your valuables as soon as you return to your car.

If you have any suspicion, do a quick check of your items before leaving. A common tactic of thieves is to take a camera out of the camera bag, but leave the bag. You are then long gone before you notice the missing item, and can’t pinpoint when it might have been taken.

9. Take your time upon return.

Most major car rental companies have automatic check-in and readily available receipts from the rental return attendant. But take a moment and really check the car. But how many times have you stored your sunglasses or phone in the same area you do in your personal car, only to leave it behind at the return station?

As a final reminder when business traveling, don’t forget the four things to always keep with you: 1) your ID (passport if traveling internationally, copies when you are out), 2) a credit card, 3) a cell phone, and 4) essential prescription medications. If you lose everything else, at least you have the things that cannot be replaced quickly and easily.

Categories
Travel Management Travel Technology

Reduce Business Travel Risk with SecurityLogic®

SecurityLogic is a duty of care assistance tool, accessible via desktop, smartphone, or tablet, that provides travel managers the ability to verify safety and location of business travelers.
SecurityLogic is a duty of care assistance tool, accessible via desktop, smartphone, or tablet, that provides travel managers the ability to verify safety and location of business travelers.

With many companies expanding their travel programs domestically, multi-nationally, or globally, business travel continues to become more and more complex, especially when it comes to risk and safety. Christopherson Business Travel understands the stress of fulfilling those duty of care requirements and provides valuable technology to help to reduce business travel risk.

Christopherson’s duty of care tool SecurityLogic®, allows travel managers to locate travelers quickly and push alerts to communicate instructions or information to travelers via text or email in emergency situations. Unlike other disaster recovery products, SecurityLogic continuously pulls data from the Global Distribution System (GDS), thereby providing real-time accuracy.

SecurityLogic also provides access to multiple global map overlays and because all travel information is geocoded to street level accuracy, travel managers can easily zoom in on any country, city, or street to find their business travelers anywhere in the world.

As an extra level of safety and communication, SecurityLogic has a two-way check-in feature called Safety Check, which allows travel managers to send travelers a check-in message to verify their safety. Upon receipt, the traveler simply responds to the message one of two ways: “I’m safe.” or “I need assistance” (with an additional field to explain their need). SecurityLogic then geocodes the traveler’s location using the GPS coordinates provided by the traveler’s cell phone.

SecurityLogic delivers the following key benefits:

  • Quickly locate travelers by name, travel date, and/or location
  • Request verification of safety and location from travelers through the check-in feature
  • Get real-time info on weather, airport delays, security, and disaster alerts
  • Push alerts directly to travelers via text and email
  • Use map overlays to view weather, traffic, and travelers anywhere in the world
  • Quickly zoom from global to street-level view

Travel managers can also find confidence in Christopherson’s service which is available 24/7/365. This means your business travelers can call us at any time to make changes to itineraries and get travel assistance in the event of an emergency or unexpected delay.

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Business Travel Travel Tips

Corporate Travel Hotel Safety

At a recent Association of Corporate Travel Executives’ (ACTE) Education Day, Detective Kevin Coffey outlined a number of best practices for business travel safety.

Most business travelers know the basics of hotel safety, but situations may arise where this isn’t the case. For example, maybe you’re staying in an unfamiliar hotel or forgot to check whether or not there were in-room safes. Here are 10 things you can do to be safer.

Top 10 safety tips for staying in a hotel

  1. Arriving at the Hotel – If you arrive at the hotel by bus or cab, stay with your luggage until it is brought into the hotel lobby. Keep a close eye on your luggage, purse, etc. when checking in. Thieves often use the distractions of a busy lobby to lift others’ belongings.
  2. Checking In – Ask the front desk personnel not to announce your name or room number. In recent years, hotels have become accustomed to writing the room number on the room key sleeve (rather than saying it aloud), but they often continue to call patrons by name. While this is friendly customer service, it unfortunately allows those around you to learn your name, and a stranger could easily call the hotel later to reach you. Also, be mindful to not leave your credit card on the check-in counter and always make sure the clerk has given back your credit card.
  3. Hotel Address – Get the hotel address and keep it accessible, whether that’s with a business card, matchbook, or digital notation in your phone. Trying to get back to your hotel when you don’t know where it’s located can be frustrating, particularly if you are staying at a chain brand with multiple hotels, or in a foreign country where you don’t speak the language.
  4. Room Selection – Avoid the ground floor. If you have no choice, choose one facing a courtyard or interior of the hotel. When possible, avoid rooms above the sixth floor, as this is generally the maximum height that fire department ladders, especially overseas, can reach.
  5. Elevator Safety – Observe all passengers in elevators. Board last and select floor buttons last. If someone suspicious boards an elevator, exit as soon as possible.
  6. Entering the Hotel Room – Check all closets, bathrooms, showers, etc., to make sure there isn’t anyone there. Examine all locks to make sure they are working properly.
  7. Inside Your Room – Keep the deadbolt or latch locked at all times. You may even want to travel with a doorstop–they’re small and can be packed easily–to wedge the door shut from the inside. Become familiar with the nearest exits and stairwells in case of an emergency. Keep your key in the same place, preferably next to the bed.
  8. Visitors at Your Door – If someone comes to the door unexpectedly, do not open it, even if they say they’re hotel staff, housekeeping, or maintenance. Ask who they are, what they need, and then call the front desk to verify.
  9. Valuables – The safest place for valuables is usually in the front desk safe. Get a receipt of items left and remember to ask if the hotel will cover any losses. When using your in-room safe, know that some safes can be opened with a master key or code. If no safe is available, lock your items in your luggage using a Milockie lock, or purchase a portable locking travel safe.
  10. Leaving Your Room – Leave the television on and place the ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign on the doorknob. If you would like maid service while you’re out, call housekeeping and ask them to keep the sign on the door. Take minimal cash and carry bait money for potential thieves. Wear minimum jewelry, especially women. Always keep these four things “on” you: 1. your ID (passport if traveling internationally, copies when you are out), 2. a credit card, 3. a cell phone, and 4. essential prescription medications. That way, if you lose everything else, at least you have the things that cannot be replaced quickly and easily.

Read our previous blog Part 1: Corporate Travel Safety On-Board an Aircraft

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Business Travel Travel Tips

Corporate Travel Safety On-board an Aircraft

Detective Kevin Coffey, President & CEO of Corporate Travel Safety, recently spoke at the Association of Corporate Travel Executives’ (ACTE) Education Day. Whether we are road warriors or once-in-a-while vacationers, Coffey reminded attendees of the safety precautions we should all be aware of. This post, which will address carry-on luggage safety, is the first installment in a three party series on the travel safety tips Coffey shared.

Most people think their valuables are safe when using a carry-on bag–that if our items are near us, we are protected. However, theft can still occur and people who steal on-board an aircraft have been both airline employees or fellow travelers. Here are 10 ways you can protect yourself and your carry-on luggage.

  1. Check Your Jacket Pockets – Before hanging your jacket, take all your valuables and your wallet out of the pockets. Anyone on-board has access to the closet and this is the first place a thief will look.
  2. Differentiate Your Bag – Many bags look alike. Just as you may distinguish your checked bag so you can find it easily at baggage claim, do the same with your carry on. This way you can avoid a mix-up with another passenger grabbing the wrong bag, or a thief saying they thought it was their bag.
  3. Stow Your Bag Upside Down – When a thief rummages through a bag, they reach their hand in the overhead bin, unzip the bag, and feel for items worth taking. This only takes seconds and most people do not know it has happened. If you turn your bag upside down, it is more difficult to get into. You can go an extra step and place valuable items in hard to reach places or zipper compartments.
  4. Stow Your Bag Across From You – Most people place their bag over their seat. Try placing your bag on the other side of the aisle. This allows for clear sight of your bag and who is getting into the overhead bin. When the bag is above you, you cannot see what the person is doing and if they are actually leaving your bag alone.
  5. Lock Your Bag – Extra security deters thieves while you are sleeping or in the lavatory. Such security may be a portable safe. This not only keeps your carry-on valuables locked up, but can be used in various situations to keep your personal items protected throughout your trip.
  6. Keep it Near You – Some people will stow their carry-on toward the front of the plane, while their seat is in the rear of the plane. But it is much easier for a thief to grab your bag and get a head start while you are still trying to deplane. Keep your luggage near you.
  7. Bury Your Cash and Wallet – Do not place your valuables in the outermost compartments where thieves have easy access. Keep a credit card to make on-board purchases and bury the rest in a hard to reach compartment.
  8. Be Aware of What You Put Under the Seat – Make sure there are no zippers or pockets facing the passenger in front of you. They have easy access to your items without you knowing. Do not leave your valuables at your seat when you need to leave your area.
  9. Common Sense – Keep your purse in front of you and your wallet out of your back pocket. This seems simple enough, but many of us forget this rule since we are preoccupied by all the other aspects of flying.
  10. If You See Something, Say Something – If you catch someone going through your bag, stay calm, as it could be an innocent mistake, but be firm. If you have caught a thief, tell someone immediately.
  11. As a final helpful tip, here are four things to always keep with you: 1) your ID (passport if traveling internationally), 2) a credit card, 3) a cell phone, and 4) essential prescription medications. If you lose everything else, at least you have the things that cannot be replaced quickly and easily. Plus, these items will get you out of a jam upon landing.

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Business Travel Travel Technology

The Benefits of Using Christopherson’s Duty of Care tool, SecurityLogic®

SecurityLogic® is one of Christopherson Business Travel’s premier travel technology tools that allows you to locate and alert your company’s travelers anywhere in the world, at any time.

For example, let’s say I just landed in Paris (from Los Angeles) and my assistant (who is flying in from Atlanta) is meeting me at the airport. My business partner left this morning from Beijing to join us, but is delayed in Jakarta. Two of our executive board members are in the air from Dallas to meet up with us, and the attorney is en-route to the Chicago airport to catch his flight to join us for dinner.

After a week of business in Paris, we are all off to a trade show in London, and then onto Dubai for a 6-hour board meeting. Because of our hectic trip, we decide to make a change on our return to be rerouted through Japan, in order to spend a few days relaxing and enjoying the Tokyo night life.

Keeping track of all the variables, flights, cities, and travelers for such a trip could be confusing and time-consuming. But with Christopherson’s SecurityLogic, each traveler has been tracked every step of the way. Additionally, if our travel manager wonders if we are okay at any point in the trip, they can send us a Safety Check alert that will come straight to our phones, to which we can then respond with a yes or no depending on our situation and needs. Ultimately, SecurityLogic® brings peace of mind to the traveler, colleagues, and loved ones at home.

To learn more about this and other tools that can enhance your company’s business travel program, contact one of our executives for more information.

Categories
Business Travel Travel Tips Vacation Travel

Top 10 Hotel Safety Tips

Making sure our clients travel safely is always a priority for us at Christopherson. Here are 10 hotel safety tips (from SuperMedia.com) to keep in mind on your next overnight trip.

1.  Be aware of your surroundings. This includes when you’re in parking lots, public areas, elevators, or the hallway to your room. Have your key ready in hand before you get to your door so you’re not distracted as you look and fumble for it.

2.  Keep your room number to yourself. Most hotels these days no longer print room numbers on the keys. But don’t share your room number with strangers, and don’t display your key in public or leave it where it can get stolen.
3.  Avoid staying on the ground floor. This will leave you much less vulnerable to break-ins and other incidents.
4.  Identify a fire escape route. Once you’ve settled in, map out the nearest fire escape route. Remember, in case of emergency, always use the stairs, never the elevator.
5.  Secure your valuables. If your room has a safe, store any extra cash, plane tickets, and other valuables in there. And never, ever leave valuables in a car in the hotel parking lot.
6.  Don’t open the door to anyone until you use the peephole to identify them. Don’t assume it’s housekeeping or maintenance just because the person says so.
7.  Keep the doors and windows locked while you’re in the room. This includes any windows or sliding glass doors. Avoid propping your door open, even for a short time. If your door has an extra bolt or chain, engage that as well.
8.  Make it seem like you’re home. When you leave your room for the day or evening, leave the TV or radio on. It may very well deter a thief if they think someone might be in the room. Hanging the Do Not Disturb sign.
9.  Enter and exit the building through a main entrance. This will help you avoid unoccupied or deserted areas. It’s also a good idea to park in a well-lit part of the parking lot, even if you have to walk a little farther to get to your room.
10.  Keep your children in sight. Children should not be allowed to play by themselves on hotel grounds. This, of course, includes the swimming pool, the playground and other kid-friendly areas, as well as the hallways, elevators, and lobby.