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Christopherson Business Travel Helps Companies Acheive Maximum Travel Policy Compliance

Communication and enforcement of travel policy is a common challenge for many companies. As a solution to that challenge, Christopherson Business Travel uses a blend of technology and established processes to verify that at the time of booking, policy guidelines will be enforced as designated by the company.

Should the policy need to be rewritten or enhanced, Christopherson can assist. Our Account Managers act as expert consultative advisors helping companies establish a fair, complete, and cost saving policy that benefits both the business travelers and the company.

Christopherson also developed PolicyLogic®, software that provides consistent application of preferred vendors, travel policy, coding, and reporting needs, as well as a new functionality that alerts travel managers and arrangers when travelers are not using preferred vendors. Travel policy configuration allows policy rules around the following categories: travel itinerary, flights, flight fares, flight classes, ticket change, car, hotel, and messaging.

These specifics are integrated with Christopherson’s experienced travel agents, online booking tools, and our mid-office and back-office systems to ensure accuracy and compliance across all booking sources. We will customize and update training and point-of-sale scripts when needed.

If business travelers book online, each action displays in the user interface reservation workflow so users clearly see policy compliance as well as policy violations at the point of sale. This empowers travelers to make better-informed decisions and help drive cost savings.

All reservations are reviewed by Compleat with your company policies and negotiated programs in mind. This resource drives costs down by auditing every reservation for compliance to your company’s travel policy and preferred-vendor lists. Compleat will not allow a ticket to be issued until the reservation is in compliance or has been approved by a manager. With these compliance reminders and checks in place, Christopherson then takes policy savings a step further by tracking trends in policy compliance to identify problem areas.

For information evaluating business travel policies, Christopherson has provided this white paper outlining a few basic steps companies can take to guide travelers and ensure compliance.

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Business Travel Travel Industry Travel Tips

Business Travel and Hotel Fees

How closely do you pay attention to your business travel hotel fees?
How closely do you pay attention to your business travel hotel fees?

For some time now, the media has been talking about the fees airlines charge to create more revenue. But, has anyone noticed the increase in hotel fees? Or have we just gotten used to them over time?

At least the airlines give you options. For instance, if you intend on flying with extra luggage, you know upfront that you will have to pay more money for those bags, whereas hotels fees, quite often, just show up on your bill, after the fact, at checkout.

If you don’t ask about, or read all the details, watch out. Here are a few additional hotel fees I’ve personally encountered:

Airport Shuttle: While many hotels don’t charge, don’t assume the shuttle is always included.

Housekeeper Gratuities: Leaving a tip for your housekeeper each day and then realizing at the end of your stay that you were also billed for this can be a rude awakening.

Bottled Water & Snacks:  Even if there is no note or card stating that it’s complimentary, ask before using.

Cancellations:  Be sure you understand your hotel’s cancellation policy or it could be very costly should you need or want to change. (How to Avoid Hotel Cancellation Fees)

Early Check-in/Late Check-out:  Most hotels are becoming very rigid about these services and are charging extra for them.

Energy Surcharges: Depending on the season, energy surcharges ($1 to $3 a day) can also appear on your bill as the hotel may require you to share the costs of increased energy usage.

Resort Fee: A resort fee can run anywhere from $10 to $50 a day and include a number of items. Even if you don’t use them, you still incur this charge. Another similar term and fee is a “grounds-keeping fee,” but it is usually much less per day.

Internet Fees: Where this has been a common inclusion at many hotels, some are now reverting back to charging. Watch out too if you have two devices—i.e. a laptop and an iPad—the property could charge for both.

With the continual rise in hotel and airline fees, surely more are on the way. And just a friendly reminder for companies with business travelers: when updating your corporate travel policy or negotiating contracts, due diligence when it comes to these fees is a must.

Avoiding Unnecessary Hotel Fees When Traveling for Business